The Kiss Booth 3: sequel addresses Elle’s maturation (criticism)

ATTENTION: POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD!

the franchise The Kiss Booth (The Kissing Booth, in the original) became a big hit over time on Netflix. In 2018, when the first movie was released, audiences didn’t expect to be so caught up in the saga of Elle Evans (Joey King) and her romantic misadventures. Finally, in 2021, a third sequel was released to close the trilogy and make some presentations on the story of its protagonist.

Dramatically, despite constituting a new story, however, the feature film lacks news, but it manages to provide a conclusive ending for the characters, even if the audience believes that many loose ends have been left by the producers. So find out more about the Netflix movie by reading our full review!

(Netflix/Reproduction)Source:  Netflix

The Kiss Booth 3: Elle’s last summer before heading off to college

Directed by Vince Marcello, perhaps the greatest asset of The Kiss Booth 3 it is precisely the charismatic performance of its protagonist that, finally, manages to have an effect in a plot that is not completely based on any other novel. This time, viewers see Ellen visibly happier and less carefree, even as some difficult and important decisions fall on her shoulders as the narrative progresses.

Despite the film’s conclusion bringing to light several elements that illustrate very well the consequences of the main character’s choices, most likely to escape the clichés of the genre, the film ended up displeasing a good part of the audience. In this sense, what is seen on screen is something that could really happen, but Marcello’s direction cannot prepare it in a satisfactory way, sounding like something rushed and undeveloped.

While The Kiss Booth 2 followed with Elle’s initial conflict — showing the character facing two of her relationships, both romantic and affectionate, with almost antagonistic siblings —, The Kiss Booth 3 it wants to be different on many levels, leaving aside some pertinent issues that have been addressed earlier.

In this way, although these small conflicts have survived up to this point, the conception of the film is different. Now the new thing is college. A new life and a new path will open up and, once again, conflicting proposals will emerge for Elle, showing how our existence is shaped by these conflicting feelings.

Therefore, Noah (Jacob Elordi) and Lee (Joel Courtney) make room for college in the protagonist’s mind, however, without necessarily being left out. And although this new element is present in the plot, it still seems that there are many issues to be matured.

(Netflix/Reproduction)(Netflix/Reproduction)Source:  Netflix

Although I don’t want to think about it so often and make the most of the moment, the feeling I get is that Elle can feel uncomfortable at any time — especially since she seems to anticipate that it would be nothing or next to nothing without her relationships with Noah and Lee. The question of her own identity hits her in an unexpected way, showing how everything could fall apart without her own perception.

Perhaps this is the main virtue of The Kiss Booth 3, that even trying to be different, ends up sounding almost the same. The feeling that remains in the public is that the producers tried their best to detach themselves from what they initially conceived, even if they were, in the end, repeating a formula. Even though the acting has evolved to some extent, the plot offers little about what is already known.

The Kiss Booth 3 is a film that may not entirely appeal to those who were eager to learn more about the continuation of Elle, Noah and Lee’s lives, but it manages to bring an important reflection to both its main character and the audience.

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