Samsung Galaxy M62 Review: Good Battery and Performance [análise/vídeo]

Everyone wants a cell phone with a battery that lasts a long time, but for many people, autonomy is a top priority. It is for this audience that the Samsung launched the Galaxy M62, a smartphone with 7,000 mAh battery and of course quick recharge.

Obviously, these aren’t the only attractions of the model. The novelty also draws attention for having a 6.7-inch Super AMOLED Plus screen, 8 GB of RAM, four cameras on the rear with a 64-megapixel main sensor and an Exynos 9825 chip, the same processor that powers the Galaxy Note 10.

Does this set perform well? And the battery, does it really care about autonomy? How is the experience of using the screen and cameras? I, Emerson Rosemary, have been testing the Samsung Galaxy M62 for two weeks and report what I found out about it in the next few moments.

ethics notice

O Techblog is an independent journalistic vehicle that has helped people make their next purchase decision since 2005. Our reviews are not intended for advertising, so they highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each product. No company has paid for, reviewed or had advance access to this content.

The Galaxy M62 was provided by Samsung on loan and will be returned to the company after testing. For more information, visit tecnoblog.net/etica.

Design, finishing and audio

The Galaxy M62 has such an interesting look that you don’t even want to put a cape on it. Although the body of the device is all plastic, Samsung has made the rear to take on a metallic gradient look that makes a great impression.

In Brazil, there are two color combinations: from black to silver and, in the case of the unit tested by Techblog, from blue to silver. These colors appear in the form of stripes. Seriously, at least live, the effect is really beautiful.


The Galaxy M62 has a stripe effect that is very beautiful (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

But beauty is not synonymous with endurance. The Galaxy M62 isn’t a fragile phone, but it doesn’t have a robust finish either, which is why it’s not a good idea to give up the case. Neither IP68 certificate exists around here.

The Galaxy M62 has fingerprint sensor on the power button (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The Galaxy M62 has fingerprint sensor on the power button (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

As usual, we find on the right side of the device the volume controls and the on / off button. Note that this button has an integrated fingerprint sensor. The component is fast and barely reads, as it has to be.

On the upper left side, Samsung has positioned the chip drawer, which can hold two SIM cards and a microSD of up to 1TB at the same time.

The chip drawer supports two SIM cards and one microSD at the same time (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The chip drawer supports two SIM cards and one microSD at the same time (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

It’s up to the bottom to bring together the connection for headphones, the USB-C port and the speaker, which unfortunately doesn’t match the audio output on the top of the device for stereo sound.

Despite this, the sound is clear and loud. But it’s good not to abuse this feature because, when the volume is at the maximum level, the audio can be distorted.

The Galaxy M62 audio is only mono (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The Galaxy M62 audio is only mono (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Screen

If screen is a very important feature for you, the Galaxy M62 has a good chance of pleasing you. The model has a Super AMOLED Plus panel that, as such, displays intense colors, with the right to deep black, in addition to providing excellent viewing from various angles.

The size of 6.7 inches and the resolution of 2400×1080 pixels are enough to fill the eyes of those who prefer large screens. Note that the component’s generous dimensions do not make the M62 a big smartphone, after all, Samsung did a good job of taking advantage of the front space.

The screen makes good use of the front space (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The screen makes good use of the front space (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

I was just hoping to find a little more brightness on this screen. Even so, the existing level of 420 nits here allows you to use your cell phone outdoors on a sunny day with some ease.

Ah, a refresh rate of 90 Hz or higher would also be nice, but the M62 follows the 60 Hz standard.

software

The Galaxy M62 comes with Android 11 and the One UI 3.1 interface, which we already know well. It stands out for its uniform look, organized settings menu, discreet transition effects and some Samsung’s own features that can come in handy.

One is a small sidebar that, when expanded, gives you quick access to the latest open apps or the apps you’ve defined. Another is the well-known Folder Segura, which protects files and applications with a password or fingerprint.

One UI 3.1 interface (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
One UI 3.1 interface (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Samsung’s classic applications are also present, such as Samsung Health, Bixby and the browser called simply the Internet. And yes, Samsung Pay is also pre-installed.

But, if on the one hand the interface is intuitive and brings useful tools, on the other hand, it bothers because, this time, it has a number of pre-installed applications that seems exaggerated to me. I would trade Samsung Free (news app and other content) and Samsung Itaucard easily for DeX, for example.

cameras

You already know that the Galaxy M62’s main camera has 64 megapixels. It comes with a 12-megapixel wide-angle sensor, as well as two other cameras with 5 megapixels each for macro and depth.

Samsung Galaxy M62 rear cameras (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Samsung Galaxy M62 rear cameras (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

While this set doesn’t have the same level of sophistication that we find in the Galaxy S family, the results don’t disappoint.

The main camera manages to make records with a very satisfactory level of detail and a well-balanced dynamic range, which doesn’t leave shadow areas darker than they should be.

However, the exposure is relatively high in certain circumstances, a detail that can make the image clear, although not to the point of detracting from the result.

Much the same can be said about the wide-angle camera. The difference here is that the images have a little less definition and may leave shadow spots a little darker compared to the main camera.

Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

These characteristics are also noticeable in recordings. The Galaxy M62 is capable of shooting 4K at 30 frames per second and you can switch between cameras during the procedure.

In night scenes, the night mode makes the sharpness drop a little due to noise removal, in both cameras. But that doesn’t make the results bad. For an intermediate smartphone, it’s a good size.

Galaxy M62 night mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Galaxy M62 night mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

The macro camera is not impressive, but at least it has a little more definition than the 2 megapixel sensors that are so common in this category.

Macro focus (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Macro focus (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

In turn, the depth camera fulfills its role of facilitating photos in portrait mode, although the blurring of the object in the foreground may fail if the phone is too close to it.

Portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Finally, we have a 32-megapixel front-facing camera that doesn’t overdo post-processing and keeps definition at decent levels. In spite of that, here, the image can also be clearer than expected, without major damage to the result.

Selfie with the front camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Selfie with the front camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Software portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Software portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Performance and battery

In 2019, when we evaluated the Galaxy Note 10+, the model did very well in performance tests. The Galaxy M62 has the octa-core Exynos 9825, the same chip that drives the Note 10+ and that emerged as a rival to the Snapdrago 855. Does this mean that the performance of the new model is also good? Means.

The processor comes with 8GB of RAM and 128GB of storage. This set allowed the Galaxy M62 to run smoothly all tested applications.

Also, I didn’t notice glitches when switching between open apps or the interface transition effects, for example. In games, the device ran Asphalt 9: Legends and breakneck without experiencing crashes or significant drop in frame rate per second.

The overall performance is great, but the M62’s strong point really lies in the battery. With 7,000 mAh, the component can be away from the outlet for two integers (or more) with some ease.

The autonomy tests were run over a day with a two-hour video on Netflix with maximum screen brightness, an hour of YouTube in the same condition, an hour of reading on Kindle with auto-brightness, an hour of Spotify via high- speakers, about half an hour of Asphalt 9: Legends and breakneck added, plus a 10-minute call.

The Samsung Galaxy M62 has a 25W charger (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The Samsung Galaxy M62 has a 25W charger (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

I started the tests in the morning with 100% load. By 10:00 pm, the Galaxy M62 was still 67% charged.

For the record, the recharge time from 15% to 100% with the 25 W charger that comes with the smartphone was approximately two hours. For a giant battery like the one we found here, it’s not a bad time.

Ah, wireless charging is not supported.

Samsung Galaxy M62: Is It Worth It?

When someone asks me for a cell phone recommendation, I often suggest that they buy a high-end, older-generation smartphone, as it’s cheaper and still has current hardware.

On the Galaxy M62, Samsung did something similar to this idea: put in the device a processor that, being from 2019, is theoretically cheaper, but still manages to play its role well.

Combine this aspect with the great battery life and we have a remarkable mid-range phone that is therefore worth it. Yes, intermediate: despite its positive features, the M62 is still a mid-range model.

Galaxy M62 (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Samsung Galaxy M62 (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

It would need a few more features to be considered a high-end device (or something close to it), such as stereo sound, IP68 certified, 90 Hz (or more) screen, and a neater set of cameras, although the current one isn’t bad.

If the Galaxy M62 interested you, just be careful with the price. The model was launched for R$3,499, but Samsung promised a promotional value of R$2,499 until the end of August 2021.

On the date of publication of this analysis, it was possible to find it for values ​​close to R$ 2,200, but, if possible, wait for the price to drop further, as, in this range, it may be more interesting to use the Galaxy S20 FE, for example, which it has a smaller battery, but it can offer a little more performance, better screen experience and a more robust finish.

Technical specifications

  • Screen: Super AMOLED Plus, 6.7 inches, Full HD+ (2400×1080 pixels), 60 Hz update, Gorilla Glass protection
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9825 2.7GHz octa-core with Mali-G76 MP12 GPU
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • Internal storage: 128GB expandable with microSD up to 1TB
  • Frontal camera: 32 megapixels (f/2.2)
  • rear cameras:
    • Main: 64 megapixels (f/1.8)
    • Wide angle: 12 megapixels (f/2.2)
    • Macro: 5 megapixels (f/2.4)
    • Depth sensor: 5 megapixels (f/2.4)
  • Drums: 7,000 mAh with 25W fast charger
  • Connections: 2G, 3G, 4G, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0 with A2DP and LE, GPS (A-GPS, Glonass, Galileo and BDS), FM radio, headphone jack, USB-C, NFC
  • Sensors: fingerprint reader on the side, accelerometer, light sensor, proximity
  • Operational system: Android 11 with One UI 3.1
  • Dimensions and weight: 163.9 x 76.3 x 9.5 mm, 218 grams

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