Review Xiaomi Poco X3: the gamer intermediary [análise/vídeo]

Officially launched in Brazil thanks to a partnership between Xiaomi and DL Electronics & Gadgets, The Poco X3 NFC arrives with an unusual proposal in our market: to be a smartphone gamer premium intermediate category. We found a 120 Hz screen here, for example. In contrast, the processor is the Snapdragon 732G.

The phone’s technical file includes 6 GB of RAM, four cameras at the rear – the main one with 64 megapixels -, a 5.160 mAh battery and Android 10 with a MIUI 12 interface. Only the suggested price starts at R $ 3,000. Is it worth paying for all this for the Poco X3? That’s what you’ll find in this review.

Video review of the Xiaomi Poco X3

Ethics notice

THE Tecnoblog is a technology-independent journalistic vehicle that helps people make their next purchase decision since 2005. Our product reviews are opinionated and have no advertising intent. For this reason, we always transparently highlight the positive and negative points of each product.

No company, manufacturer or store has paid the Tecnoblog to produce this content. Our reviews are not reviewed or approved by external agents. The Poco X3 NFC was provided by DL on loan. The product will be returned to the company after testing.

Design, finish and audio

Xiaomi developed the Poco X3 to be different in many ways. It starts with the visual. On the rear, the ‘Poco’ brand appears in bold letters. I thought I would find this detail strange, but the truth is that I liked the metallic sheen that the logo takes on when the device is viewed from different angles.

Xiaomi Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

I also liked the color. The unit sent to Tecnoblog it has a metallic gray (Shadow Gray) that hangs slightly towards blue and a striped band in the center that makes a good impression. At the top of this strip is the module that gathers the cameras. This is a “relief” for those who can no longer stand to find smartphones with cameras aligned to the left.

The finish is not the most advanced, however. While the sides are aluminum, the rear is made of a plastic that does not appear to be very resistant. The good news is that the Poco X3 comes with a silicone case that wraps around the smartphone so well that it is difficult to remove.

Note that the case also protects the USB-C port (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Note that the case also protects the USB-C port (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The volume controls and the power button are on the right side. This button has a good fingerprint sensor: unlocking is quick and almost always works the first time. The hybrid chip drawer (two SIM cards or one SIM card plus microSD) is left alone on the left side.

Xiaomi Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Xiaomi Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

At the top, we come across some holes for microphone and infrared. This detail refers to one of the notable characteristics of the Poco X3: the device owes nothing in terms of connectivity. NFC (as the official name denounces) and FM radio, for example, are included in the package.

A detail that is also worth noting concerns the finish: the Xiaomi Poco X3 is IP53 certified, that is, it guarantees some protection against dust and water splashes.

Xiaomi Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Xiaomi Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

In addition to the connection for headphones (not included with the Poco X3) and the USB-C port, the bottom of the phone has an audio output that works in conjunction with the speaker on the top of the device to provide stereo sound.

Despite that, I wouldn’t say that the Poco X3 offers an impressive sound experience. The audio has a high maximum volume and of course, but depending on what is being played, the sound may sound muffled or sound excessively high-pitched.

Screen and its 120 Hz

The screen is one of the most striking features of the Poco X3. Look at what it offers: 6.67 inches size, 2400 × 1080 pixels resolution, HDR10, 20: 9 format, 120 Hz refresh rate and 240 Hz touch sampling rate.

Basically, the 120 Hz rate indicates that the screen is updated 120 times per second. In practice, this means that you will be able to notice animations or movements in images more fluidly. This tends to make the gaming experience more interesting, especially for those with fast scenes.

In games like Real Racing 3, for example, you can tell the difference, although you have to pay close attention to it. 120 Hz makes movement more natural, so to speak, than if the rate were at 60 Hz (the standard for smartphones).

Poco X3 screen (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Poco X3 screen (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The touch sampling rate, on the other hand, indicates the number of times per second that the device is able to detect a touch on the screen. This translates into faster responses to commands. I didn’t notice any difference in any of the games tested, to be honest, but this attribute can help the user in games that require a lot of touch on the screen.

The maximum brightness of the screen is very strong and the colors are displayed vividly. But, as this is an LCD panel, the black is not deep and you may notice loss of hues when looking at the screen from different angles. If the panel were OLED, this would be a screen killer.

At least it is possible to configure it in several ways. “Reading mode”, for example, makes the screen warmer to allow you to read long texts more comfortably.

Software: how is MIUI?

The Poco X3 comes with Android 10 and the interface MIUI 12. On the one hand, I liked the visual elements. The settings menu is well organized, the notification area displays a bar instead of a line in the brightness adjustment and the list of open applications is organized in two columns, for example.

It bothered me a little that, by default, the interface doesn’t add shortcuts to newly installed apps on home screens, although you can change that. On the other hand, MIUI automatically organizes apps into categories such as communication, entertainment and photography. This is cool.

MIUI no Poco X3 (catches: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

MIUI no Poco X3 (catches: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The customization features are also cool. You can change the wallpaper or get themes easily using native apps for that purpose. Many of these themes are “premium”, however. To access them, you need to watch advertising videos (!!!).

We are also faced here with a good set of Xiaomi’s own apps, including a note tool, audio recorder, document scanner (with OCR) and Mi Remote (to use the phone as a remote control).

MIUI no Poco X3 (catches: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

MIUI no Poco X3 (catches: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Except that pre-installed bloatwares (games and apps like AliExpress) score points, as well as the Security and Cleaning apps: they bring maintenance tools that can be useful, but display excessive notifications.

In general, MIUI 12 is practical and versatile. It just needed to be less polluted.

Cameras

The Poco X3 deviates from the standard on several parameters, but embraces the trend of the four cameras at the rear. The main one, in the upper right corner, has a Sony IMX 682 sensor with 64 megapixels. In the center, Xiaomi positioned a wide angle of 119 degrees and 13 megapixels. The bottom two cameras are 2 megapixels each and serve for macro (left) and depth (right).

Poco X3 cameras (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Poco X3 cameras (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The main camera is by far the best. When lighting conditions help, it records images with great definition, vivid but not overly saturated colors, and decent noise control.

An interesting detail is that the main camera can also be used to apply 2x digital zoom. As the sensor has 64 megapixels, the application performs a kind of clipping of the central part of the image to generate the approximation effect. The result is pleasant most of the time.

The wide angle loses in definition. The camera application has a function (which can be disabled) that corrects distortions related to the angle. This may explain, at least in part, the fact that the loss of detail is more visible at the edges of the image. Anyway, the results are usually decent if the light conditions help.

Main (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Main (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Zoom (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Zoom (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Wide angle (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Wide angle (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Main (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Main (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Zoom (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Zoom (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Wide angle (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Wide angle (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

At night, don’t expect miracles. There is a night mode that is of great help in low light conditions, even so, the definition drops a lot due to the post-processing for noise control.

No night mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

No night mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

With night mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

With night mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The macro camera I didn’t like very much. The focus is fast and the coloring is intense, but the definition is very low. If the sensor had at least 5 megapixels, the results would be more interesting here.

Macro (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Macro (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

The depth camera works well. It helps the main camera to record photos with blurred background quickly and accurately, as it has to be.

    Portrait mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Portrait mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

I couldn’t leave the front camera aside, because it is a pleasant surprise. With a 20 megapixel sensor, the component generates selfies with great definition in the foreground and does a good job of blurring in portrait mode.

Selfie in portrait mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Selfie in portrait mode (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Selfie

“Normal” selfie (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Performance and battery

The Snapdragon 732G chip that runs the Poco X3 is, in Qualcomm’s own words, optimized for gaming. In fact, the smartphone ran with ease all the tested titles for this review, such as Real Racing 3, Asphalt 9: Legends and Breakneck.

But this with the graphic settings in medium or automatic. If you are the type who sets the graphics to the maximum level, you will notice a drop in the frame rate with some ease. The Snapdragon 732G struggles, but it’s not a high-end processor.

Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

In everyday use, the hardware suite, which includes 6 GB and 64 GB of storage, behaves well. But, if you have many applications open, you may notice an eventual delay in the response or switching between them. Fortunately, this is an uncommon problem. In general, the Poco X3 performs quite satisfactorily.

At this point, it is worth highlighting the LiquidCool Plus, a cooling system based on a copper tube combined with multiple layers of graphite that was positioned just below the rear of the Poco X3. It seems that the mechanism really does its duty: during the games, I noticed some heating in the device, but discreet.

With its 5,160 mAh battery, it gives a show. To test the component, I ran two hours of video on Prime Video with maximum brightness on the screen, I played Real Racing 3, Asphalt 9: Legends and Breakneck for about 15 minutes each, I used a browser and networks for an hour, listened to Spotify via speakers for an hour and ended with a 10-minute call.

I started the test in the morning. At around 10 pm, the device still had a 48% charge. Very good! This with the screen operating at 120 Hz, so it uses more energy. Then, the next day, I repeated the tests with the screen at 60 Hz. The result? 62% load.

Poco X3 charger (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Poco X3 charger (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

To top it off, the Poco X3 comes with a 33 W charger. With it, the recharge time from 12% to 100% was 1h10min, great time for a battery with more than 5,000 mAh.

Xiaomi Poco X3: is it worth it?

Testing the Poco X3 was a very interesting experience. Xiaomi’s efforts to make it a resourceful intermediary and, above all, to embrace the “gamer cause” are visible.

The screen, generous in size and with a frequency of 120 Hz, is one of the strong points – it would be even more if the panel were OLED, but that’s fine. The peculiar design is expected to divide opinions, but I suspect that most users will be satisfied with the look of the device when having it in hand.

The software could be a little leaner, but it is still well organized and has useful features. The battery can handle the job without complaint and the recharge is really fast. The overall performance makes it clear that this is not a high-end phone. Still, the Snapdragon 732G does its job with dignity.

Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

Poco X3 (image: Tecnoblog / Emerson Alecrim)

But there is a serious problem: the price. The Poco X3 was originally developed to combine a wide range of features with value for money. However, in Brazil, this relationship is lost, partly due to the high dollar scenario.

The version tested here, with 64 GB of storage, has a suggested price of R $ 3,000. The 128 GB version costs R $ 3,300. These are high values. If you want to pay more than R $ 2,000, it is more business to run for the Samsung Galaxy S10 Lite, for example, which does not have a 120 Hz screen or cooling system, but comes with the Snapdragon 855 and costs less.

If you can’t find the Poco X3 launched here at a good discount, the model will only be worthwhile for those who are enthusiastic about Xiaomi or don’t mind paying a little more to have an Android experience different from that offered by other brands. in Brazil.

Xiaomi Poco X3 NFC – specs

  • Screen: 6.67 inch IPS LCD, Full HD + resolution (2400 × 1080 pixels), 395 ppi, HDR10, 20: 9 aspect ratio, 120 Hz refresh rate, 240 Hz touch sample rate, Gorilla Glass 5
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 732G octa-core up to 2.3 GHz (Kryo 470) and Adreno 618 GPU
  • RAM: 6 GB of LPDDR4X
  • Storage: 64 GB or 128 GB (UFS 2.1) expandable with microSD up to 256 GB
  • Rear cameras:
    • Main: Sony IMX 682 64 megapixel, f / 1.89
    • Wide angle: 13 megapixel, f / 2.2, 119 degrees
    • Macro: 2 megapixel, f / 2.4
    • Depth: 2 megapixel, f / 2.4
  • Frontal camera: 20 megapixel, f / 2.2
  • Drums: 5.160 mAh, 33 W charger
  • Operational system: Android 10 with MIUI 12 interface
  • Connectivity: USB-C, headphone jack (3.5 mm), Bluetooth 5.1, Wi-Fi 5, FM radio, infrared, NFC, GPS, Beidou, Glonass, Galileo, two SIM (hybrid)
  • Sensors: digital reader on the side, accelerometer, gyroscope, proximity, compass
  • Others:, IP53 certified, LiquidCool Plus cooling system and dual speaker
  • Dimensions and weight: 165.3 x 76.8 x 9.4 mm; 215 g

Xiaomi Poco X3

Pros

  • Large 120 Hz screen
  • Battery with great autonomy
  • 33 W fast charger
  • Design that is out of the ordinary
  • Broad set of connectivity

Cons

  • Bloatware software
  • Macro camera does not excite
  • Cost-benefit is lost in Brazil

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