Razer Naga X Review: Towards a Niche within the Gamer Niche [análise/vídeo]

The Naga X mouse is one more among a multitude of Razer options for those who want to wear the shirt for real gamer, as well as being one of the most recent of the brand. It is an evolution of the mouse known for working focused on MMO games, it offers 16 programmable buttons and 12 of them are grouped only in one place, with the possibility of even doubling this count with a feature from the manufacturer itself.

The mouse is lighter and more ergonomic when compared to other Razer models, but won’t that number of buttons get in the way of life? Is the footprint interesting? Worth it?

Razer Naga X Gamer Mouse Review on Video

ethics notice

O Techblog is an independent news vehicle that has been helping people make their next purchase decision since 2005. Our reviews are not intended for advertising, so they highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each product. No company has paid for, reviewed or had advance access to this content.

The Razer Naga X was provided by Razer on loan and will be returned to the company after testing. For more information, visit tecnoblog.net/etica.

Design, usability and comfort

The first impression the Naga X gives is that it has a phone on the side, it is too big and uncomfortable. In fact, it’s not the best mouse for anyone working or even for every type of game. The goal of the Naga line is in MMOs, so much so that in others, like first person shooters, the experience can be pretty bad – and it is, quite a lot.

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

I suffered and bumped many times on the side buttons, triggering different functions when I lifted the mouse to continue the vision movement. That’s exactly why a game with camera locked on the character and few mouse movements is the focus of this model.

Still talking about the Naga X side buttons, you can configure keyboard shortcuts here, along with opening applications or programs, also going to macro recording. It’s a very good world to access so much information and options in an MMO. But honestly, in my use I got lost and thought that this whole range of possibilities in shortcuts could be divided between the keyboard and the mouse.

My biggest complaint is the proximity of the buttons. I have often pressed the wrong one. Yes, they have different textures and some details to help with memorization, but in the end it would be better to reduce the number of buttons and increase their physical size, than to fill the side area with so many.

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

On the other hand, the palm or claw grip is comfortable due to the supports present for practically all fingers. Movement is fast at a weight of just 85 grams, but small hands will keep your fingers farther away from traditional mouse buttons. In my case, it was on the threshold and I felt that I would need to move the footprint further, even if it was not really necessary.

I say this because of the click area, which was within reach of all fingers. Speaking of which, clicks are registered by an optical switch from Razer in its second generation. Pressing the buttons is fast and the space between starting to press the button and hearing the noise of the accepted command is almost zero, bordering on instantaneous. And, no, even being a gamer, the Razer Naga X won’t wake up the whole house when the game is on. It is even quieter than other models in the Naga line.

The scroll button is also not the noisiest and Razer decided to remove the side triggers from it. This type of feature could give up to two extra buttons for total count, but it was left out and is missed even when the user is in something other than the game itself.

Just below the scroll is the precision control for the motion reader, a shortcut for configuring up to five presets. It is lowered and makes sense, prevents unintentional triggering during a match.

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

Finally, the mouse has LEDs in the scroll part and all the side buttons, but not in the Razer logo. Lights can be configured in a number of ways. The cable is covered in fabric, offering almost no drag and delivering little resistance when flexed.

Oh sure, as all the extra buttons are on one side and the mouse itself is designed to let the ring finger rest in a specific place, the Naga X only works well with right-handed people.

Software and customization

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

When plugging the Naga X into the computer for the first time, Windows will certainly identify the mouse and propose the installation of a software to control the functions, shortcuts and macros: the Razer Synapse. The app experience is good even for those who are not used to the gaming world. The menus are contrasting, playful and with few options in the basic parts, but still with enough data for finer adjustments.

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

Around here the lights are controlled and even synchronized with other peripherals with LEDs in a gamer setup, which is not my case. Still in Synapse, the user can calibrate the mouse movement and manually adjust the sensor resolution, starting from 100 and going up to 18 thousand DPI.

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

Razer Synapse (Image: Playback/Razer)

All settings can be stored in the cloud for download later to a new computer, or else to the startup PC.

Razer Naga X gamer mouse: is it worth it?

Look, the Naga X gamer mouse is a niche product, within a niche. Even though it’s one of Razer’s many options, it only makes sense to MMO players, as a World of Warcraft of life. In all other scenarios it gets in the way more than it helps, especially with the side buttons.

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

Razer Naga X (Image: André Fogaça/Tecnoblog)

Looking at this scenario, the Naga X could be nice if it delivered an option to decrease the amount of buttons and take some macros to the keyboard. As he’s a gamer within an already separate audience, these folks certainly have a keyboard with these macro functions. Ergonomics thanks.

Do you know who has this option to change the side for fewer buttons? The Naga Trinity by the same Razer, which puts a magnetic side to replace these 12 buttons with two  or seven, and all ergonomics reappear, besides serving for much more than just such a specific type of game.

It was released for a higher price, but at the time of publication of this review the Naga Trinity can be found for approximately R$700, practically the same amount as the Naga X. The maximum resolution of the motion sensor doesn’t beat 18 thousand DPI, but the ability to use a single product for more times in your day, even going to watch videos like this on YouTube, is more advantageous.

While Naga X costs about the same as Naga Trinity, I can’t recommend the former. It is simpler and more limited, besides not having the LED in the Razer logo that it has in the Naga Trinity.

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