Motorola Moto G60 Review: Power and Balance [análise/vídeo]

O Motorola Moto G60 it’s that intermediary that makes you wonder how the Moto G line evolved. With Snapdragon 732G processor, 6.8 inch screen with 120 Hz refresh rate and 6 GB RAM, the Moto G60 is positioned below the Moto G100 and has the mission to compete with the Galaxy A52. Other highlights of the device are the triple camera, the main one being 108 megapixels, and the huge battery of 6,000 mAh.

It landed in Brazil with the suggested price of R$ 2,699, but it already appears in retail for much less. Does it make sense? Are the cameras good? And the performance? In the last few weeks, the Moto G60 was my main cell phone and I share my experience using it in this review.

Motorola Moto G60 Video Review

ethics notice

O Techblog is an independent journalistic vehicle that has helped people make their next purchase decision since 2005. Our reviews are not intended for advertising, so they highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each product. No company has paid for, reviewed or had advance access to this content.

The Moto G60 was provided by Motorola on loan and will be returned to the company after testing. For more information, visit tecnoblog.net/etica

design

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

My first impressions with the Moto G60 were positive. The cell phone is so beautiful that, today, I see the past generation with different eyes. The design and the big screen soon caught my eye: Motorola worked a lot on these two points, but that doesn’t mean it delivered upgrades that many expected. The Moto G60 comes with shiny plastic all over the rear, although the metallic aspect conveys a feeling of a premium product, the material used is very simple.

Now, what is most impressive, after finishing, is the weight. The Moto G60 manages to be heavier than the Galaxy M51, with its 7,000 mAh battery. For comparison, Samsung’s smartphone weighs 213 grams, while Motorola’s has 220 grams. It is possible to feel some discomfort after a few hours of playing on the device.

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The device’s curved sides house the on/off buttons, volume and a dedicated Google Assistant. It also features a USB-C connection, a standard headphone jack and the traditional fingerprint reader on the back, which has a fast response. The chip and memory card drawer unfortunately only accepts a nano-SIM and a microSD of up to 1TB.

There is a tendency for advanced intermediates to come in with water certification, a more than welcome protection. Note that Redmi Note 10S delivers IP53 and Galaxy A52 has IP67. However, Motorola did not attach importance to this type of security and the G60, like the G100, does not offer any IP rating.

screen and sound

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The Moto G60’s screen generates a feeling of love and hate. For those who like it, the big screen is great for watching a movie and playing a PUBG or Asphalt 9. The downside is the absence of an AMOLED panel, which already appears in even cheaper competitors. The model bets on a 6.8-inch IPS LCD with Full HD+ resolution (2460 x 1080 pixels) and 120 Hz refresh rate, for smoother navigations.

In other words, don’t expect such accurate color fidelity or deep black as the competition. Even below, you’ll have access to a good LCD: the brightness is strong, the definition is pleasing and the viewing angles are good. The hole at the top houses a front camera and consequently favored immersion as the notch was removed. And on the edges, the device only has a larger chin that doesn’t spoil the usability as much.

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The mono speaker, located at the bottom, makes me wrinkle my nose. First, because it’s not that tall, so it fails to deliver a more immersive gaming experience. Second, in my opinion, it should be stereo, considering the cell phone category, and Motorola, unfortunately, missed the opportunity to take advantage of the calling component to enrich the sound system.

software

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

In software, the Moto G60 comes out of the box running Android 11. The phone doesn’t arrive full of bloatware and, in addition to Google tools, there are those exclusive Motorola apps: App Box, Hello You and Moto, famous for allowing the user customize the system. You can turn the flashlight on and off with a quick swipe (but hold the phone tight so it doesn’t fall out); when you rotate the device, the camera app starts to open and there are still other cool features.

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

With significant changes, Google made Android 12 official, with a focus on privacy, personalization through Material You and more responsive widgets. To the Techblog, Motorola has confirmed that the Moto G60 will receive this version at some point. The big problem is: the intermediary will only have this update. Meanwhile, the Galaxy A52 and A72 will receive Android 12, 13 and 14. You can’t ignore Motorola’s decision, do you?

cameras

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

On the back of the phone we come across a beautiful and eye-catching greenish module that brings together lenses and flash. The Moto G60 has three cameras that are enough for this model, you’ll understand later. Let’s get to them: the main one has 108 MP with f/1.9 aperture (note that this is the first Moto G with this high resolution); the 8-megapixel f/2.2 secondary is hybrid, used as ultrawide and macro; and we close with a 2 megapixel depth sensor.

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The main lens works with Ultra pixel technology, promising nine times more light sensitivity, with “sharper and brighter” registers as a result. I could see that the Moto G60’s post-processing increases the saturation, the colors are vibrant, which I like, and the shadows come out more highlighted. Exposure, in most cases, is controlled, but the device may have difficulties in dealing with chromatic aberrations.

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with Motorola Moto G60's main camera + depth sensor (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with Motorola Moto G60’s main camera + depth sensor (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with Motorola Moto G60's main camera + depth sensor (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with Motorola Moto G60’s main camera + depth sensor (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The depth sensor enables the user to make the famous portrait mode. I had a problem with this lens while capturing a tree trunk. The exposure was completely impaired and the sensor was unable to perform the crop. In another test, the situation improved: the tree is a little darkened, but the blur is great.

Motorola got a lot right by adding a hybrid lens to this device, so we don’t have the measly 2 MP macro for companies to be able to emphasize just numbers. In the case of this intermediate, a lens can work as ultrawide and macro: the first one suffers a little with the sharpness and the chromatic aberrations appear again, however it is possible to notice a gain in brightness, with an emphasis on green, blue and white. The macro does not disappoint and you can extract good results. The definition is not 100% compromised, the detail is even greater outdoors and the color remains intense.

Photo taken with the Motorola Moto G60 ultrawide camera (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the Motorola Moto G60 ultrawide camera (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the Motorola Moto G60 ultrawide camera (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the Motorola Moto G60 ultrawide camera (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the macro camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the macro camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the macro camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the macro camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

I also liked the Night Mode for giving me “more natural” night records. The feature tries to minimize artificial lighting ghosting, strives to eliminate noise and, finally, the contrast is more visible in this type of scenario.

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 + Night Mode (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 + Night Mode (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 + Night Mode (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the main camera of the Motorola Moto G60 + Night Mode (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Finally, we come to the 32 megapixel front camera, which is not impressive but has good quality. Although the shadows are too dark, the definition is satisfactory and the skin tone is natural. With portrait mode, it can happen that the photo bursts and the software gets in the way when cropping the subject.

Photo taken with the front camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the front camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the front camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Photo taken with the front camera of the Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Hardware and battery

Moving on to the hardware, you can see big numbers in the specs. Moto G60 is equipped with Snapdragon 732G, it is the same processor that equips Redmi Note 10 Pro and Poco X3, other good intermediates. Qualcomm’s chip in the G60 works together with 6 GB of RAM and 128 GB of internal space, a configuration very similar to that of the Galaxy A72. This Snapdragon isn’t quite as powerful as other 800 series models, but it won’t generate any headaches for the user either.

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Asphalt 9, PUBG and Call of Duty run on your Motorola smartphone with peace of mind. Other lightweight titles available on the Play Store, by the same token, were executed with aplomb. And even with a lot of apps open, I didn’t really notice any glitches and multitasking remained good.

The Galaxy M31 made my eyes shine with its 6,000 mAh battery and how nice it is to see other brands betting on these exorbitant numbers. Being very straightforward, the Motorola Moto G60 has an excellent autonomy and it brings a charger that is also excellent. With screen brightness at maximum, 120 Hz mode enabled and connected to 5 GHz Wi-Fi, I consumed 2 hours of Netflix, 1 hour of YouTube, 1 hour more browsing social networks and ended up with 15 minutes of Asphalt 9. The battery from 100% to 56% — an autonomy that made me smile. Imagine if the screen brightness was reduced?

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The charger shipped in the box is 20 watts of power. It’s not a surprising number, given that there are brands betting on 30 and 33 watts — it’s another trend among advanced intermediates. Still, in practice, the accessory does not look bad: with only 1% charge, I plugged the device in and 100% appeared after 2:12 am, not bad.

Motorola Moto G60: is it worth it?

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The Moto G60 was launched for R$2,699 and already appears in stores for R$2,400. With the arrival of other advanced intermediates in recent months, such as the Redmi Note 10 line and the Galaxy A52 and A72, the sector has become even more agitated and competitive. I see that the Moto G60 will be able to fight them, even more if prices go down. But let’s face it, Motorola could deliver more, right?

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

Motorola Moto G60 (Image: Darlan Helder/Tecnoblog)

The Moto G60 is a phone with many pros and cons. I think the big downside is the absence of an AMOLED panel. Devices like Realme 7 Pro, Redmi Note 10S and Galaxy A72 already bring the technology and, combined with the 120 Hz rate, the model had everything to get a 10 in this regard. The simpler design material doesn’t displease me, but IP certification, another trend among smartphones in this category, is lacking.

All that said, you ask me: who should buy this Motorola? The Moto G60 is for those who like the brand’s ecosystem and are looking for power at a friendlier price. Basically, it is an alternative to the Moto G100, which costs almost R$4,000. In case you’re not more resistant, it’s worth looking at the competitors mentioned in this review, which can offer a superior screen, more interesting cameras and Android 12, 13 and 14.

Motorola Moto G60

pros

  • Very pleasing design and finish
  • 6,000 mAh battery is a highlight
  • Large screen favors immersion in movies and games
  • Hybrid camera (ultrawide and macro) is a hit

cons

  • Deserved an AMOLED panel, right?
  • No protection against water and dust
  • Will only get Android 12; competitors will receive 12, 13 and 14

Technical specifications

  • Screen: 6.8 inches with Full HD+ resolution (2460 x 1080 pixels), HDR10 and 120 Hz refresh rate;
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 732G and Adreno 618 GPU;
  • RAM: 6GB;
  • Storage: 128GB, expandable via microSD memory card;
  • Quad rear camera:
    • main: 108 megapixels (f/1.9);
    • ultrawide and macro: 8 megapixels (f2.2);
    • depth:2 megapixels;
  • Frontal camera: 32 megapixels (f/2.2);
  • Drums: 6,000 mAh, with 20 watt TurboPower fast charging;
  • Operational system: Android 11;
  • Connectivity:4G, Bluetooth 5.0, 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, NFC, USB-C and 3.5mm headphone jack;
  • More: fingerprint reader on the back and facial unlock;
  • Dimensions: 169.6 x 75.9 x 9.8 mm;
  • Weight: 220 grams.

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