Motorola Edge 20 Pro Review: Going Beyond the Screen Itself [análise/vídeo]


Motorola Edge 20 Pro (Image: Emerson Rosemary)

Until the not-too-distant past, high-end smartphones weren’t a priority for the Motorola. But the company changed its stance and, today, it embraces this category as much as the others. The most recent test goes by the name of Motorola Edge 20 Pro.

Launched in Brazil in August 2021, this is the most advanced model in the Edge 20 family. The Pro version stands out for having a Snapdragon 870 chip, 12 GB of RAM, 6.7-inch OLED screen and three rear cameras — one of them is a periscopic camera for optical zoom.

Motorola is also keen to highlight the modes ready for, which allow you to connect your cell phone to a TV or monitor, or even a PC for file transfer and other tasks.

Considering all this and a little more, Motorola asks R$ 4,999 for the Edge 20 Pro. Is it worth spending this amount? I, Emerson Rosemary, spent two weeks testing the device. I’ll tell you what I found out about him from now on.

Motorola Edge 20 Pro Review in Video

ethics notice

O Techblog is an independent journalistic vehicle that has helped people make their next purchase decision since 2005. Our reviews are not intended for advertising, so they highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each product. No company has paid for, reviewed or had advance access to this content.

The Edge 20 Pro was provided by Motorola on loan and will be returned to the company after testing. For more information, visit tecnoblog.net/etica.

Design, finishing and digital reader

If you don’t like the trend towards brightly colored cell phones, don’t worry. In Brazil, the Edge 20 Pro is available in sober tones: white and, in the case of the unit tested by Techblog, blue. It is a dark, matte blue, but with a bright appearance that changes according to the light position. The effect is beautiful, at least “live”.

Edge 20 Pro has a sober but beautiful color (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Edge 20 Pro has a sober but beautiful color (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

The rear surface contributes to this. The smartphone’s body is made of aluminum, but this area is covered by a layer of glass that, in addition to making a good impression, is comfortable to the touch.

Despite this, you will probably prefer to use a cape, as the back is easily fingermarked. The good news is that the product packaging comes with one.

If on the one hand the Edge 20 Pro is wide — it’s 76 mm wide —, on the other, it’s thin: it’s 8 mm thick. The sides are even thinner because of a curved edge. Here’s the effect: the volume controls and the on/off switch on the right side are also slim.

The on / off has a fingerprint sensor (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The on / off has a fingerprint sensor (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

This detail made me think that the fingerprint reader wouldn’t work well — it’s integrated into the power switch. Fortunately, I was mistaken. Despite the tiny size of the sensor, reading is fast and accurate on most attempts.

On the left side we find a tiny and lonely button for Google Assistant. Too bad it can’t be configured for other tasks.

Google Assistant Button (Image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Google Assistant Button (Image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

The chip drawer? Supporting two SIM cards, it shares space with the USB-C port and audio output on the bottom. Note that there is no 3.5mm headphone jack here.

I must also say that the smartphone is IP52 certified for protection against splashing water. That’s something, but in that category I was hoping to find something more complete, so to speak, like IP68 certification.

The chip drawer is at the bottom (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The chip drawer is at the bottom (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

screen and audio

The Edge 20 Pro has one of the best screens I’ve ever encountered on a Motorola phone. It starts with the dimensions: this is a 6.7-inch panel with a resolution of 2400×1080 pixels, 20:9 format, good use of front space and, unlike its predecessor, a completely straight surface.

The screen also has HDR10+ and a 144Hz refresh rate which, as such, really does feel more fluid in animations, transition effects and the like.

However, this parameter is set by default to be automatically adjusted at rates up to 120 Hz. If you want to leave it at 144 Hz, you need to enable this option in the system settings, with the exception that this change may increase the consumption of energy.

OLED screen making its presence felt (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
OLED screen making its presence felt (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

As this is an OLED panel, colors are vividly displayed, black is deep, viewing from varying angles is excellent, and maximum brightness is satisfactory (although I was under the impression it could be a little higher).

Too bad the audio doesn’t follow all this refinement. Perhaps to cut costs, Motorola did not equip the Edge 20 Pro with stereo sound. There is only one audio output on the bottom that has good volume and clear sound, but the experience would be more immersive if it were paired with a speaker on top of the device.

software

Motorola is keen to point out that Edge 20 Pro comes with Android 11 and an almost pure interface. In fact, we don’t find many visual modifications here. On the other hand, there is an important amount of functional features implemented by the company.

A good example is gesture navigation, which replaces the traditional three-button configuration. In this mode, you use gestures on the inside of the screen to go back or access the list of open apps, for example.

Edge 20 Pro Software (Image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Edge 20 Pro Software (Image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

At first, you get a little lost with the commands, but once you get the hang of it, you realize they’re very practical. Either way, you can enable three-button navigation in the settings.

Motorola hasn’t left out classic features. An example: motion commands, such as the one that activates the flashlight when the cell phone is shaken twice, work on the model.

For those concerned with operating system updates, Motorola has guaranteed that the Edge 20 line will receive at least two new versions of Android, in addition to security updates for at least two years.

ready for

You can’t talk about Edge 20 Pro software without addressing Ready For. This is a feature that connects the device to a TV or monitor so you can play movies, participate in video calls, play games, and even access a desktop interface on a larger screen.

This feature is not new. It is available for the Moto G100, for example. But in Edge 20 Pro, Ready For introduces a wireless connection mode, as long as your TV or monitor supports Miracast.

For screens not compatible with Miracast, the alternative is to use a USB-C to HDMI cable — Motorola sells a kit with a type cable and a dock.

To activate Ready For, simply establish a cable or Miracast connection and activate the feature’s icon in the notification area. Then choose one of the available categories: Desktop, TV, Games, and Chat, which uses your phone’s cameras as a webcam. You can also mirror your smartphone screen.

Ready For via cable on a monitor (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Ready For via cable on a monitor; the screen displays the Edge 20 Pro desktop mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

If you choose TV, for example, Ready For will show the video apps installed on the mobile phone, such as YouTube and Amazon Prime Video. With the help of a Bluetooth keyboard, you can also activate the desktop option to turn your smartphone into a PC. If you don’t have a mouse nearby, the Edge 20 Pro’s screen can be used as a trackpad.

It’s true that many apps don’t have an interface suitable for this mode. Still, Ready For can be a quick fix when you’re in a hotel, for example.

Ready for PC

The Edge 20 line also brings Ready For PC, which allows an increased connection from cell phone to your computer. This can be done via a USB cable or via Wi-Fi, as long as the smartphone and PC are on the same network.

On your computer, you need to install Ready For Assistant, which can be downloaded from the Motorola website. When opened, the app displays a QR Code that should be read by the Edge 20 Pro. With that, the connection is established.

Ready For PC (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Ready For PC (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

You can then run mobile apps right on your PC, read notifications and even transfer files from one to the other.

Through a USB cable, you also have the option of using the Edge 20 Pro as your computer’s webcam. You can switch between the front and rear camera, even while streaming.

cameras

Speaking of cameras, let’s get to them. Motorola points out that the entire Edge 20 line has a 108 megapixel main sensor on the back. However, the Pro version is the only one that brings a periscopic camera with an 8 megapixel sensor for 5x optical zoom.

Edge 2O Pro is the only one in the line with a periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
The Edge 20 Pro is the only one in the line with a periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

When the lighting conditions help, the main camera takes pictures with fine noise control, wide dynamic range and excellent definition.

In dimly lit environments, the setting drops a little, but still stays at acceptable levels, especially if you turn on NightVision mode.

For the record, the main camera can also record at 8K and 24fps or 4K at 60fps, but with a maximum duration of 5 and 10 minutes, respectively.

If you shoot in 1080p, you can switch between the three cameras while recording. In general, the results are very good, although I got the impression that there was some color missing here.

The periscopic camera, with its optical zoom of up to 5x, is really a strong point of the device. With it, the levels of detail and dynamic range remain at interesting levels. The colors are convincing because they are not over-saturated, a detail that is also true for the main camera.

And don’t think that shooting with the zoom camera is time-consuming. At first, you may have a bit of trouble locating your subject as close as possible, but once you get the hang of it, you shoot quickly.

Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom with the periscopic camera (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Wide angle (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera with NightVision (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Main camera with NightVision (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom at night (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
5x zoom at night (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

The Edge 20 Pro also features a 16 megapixel camera that caters for both macro and wide angle. In the latter mode, the photo tends to be a little darker compared to the main camera and the definition drops a little, but the results are still appreciable.

As for macro mode, well, we’re so used to 2 megapixel sensors for this that it’s a relief to find a camera that delivers results with a lot of detail, as is the case here.

Macro (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Macro (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

We also have the front camera, with a 32 megapixel sensor. She records selfies with a great pattern of coloring and detailing. Cropping in portrait mode can be a little fuzzy, but overall it’s pleasing.

Selfie with almost perfect portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Selfie with almost perfect portrait mode (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Performance and battery

Of course, the Edge 20 Pro would be more expensive if Motorola had placed the Snapdragon 888 here. But the smartphone chip is a slightly inferior model, the Snapdragon 870, which is complemented with the Adreno 650 GPU.

Despite that, don’t think that the cell phone is bad in performance. Along with 12 GB of RAM, the Snapdragon 870 handled all activities with aplomb, including multitasking. Games like Asphalt 9: Legends and Real Racing 3 also ran well, with no noticeable drop in frame rate.

For storage, the device has 256 GB of capacity. Thankfully, there is no microSD slot here.

Motorola Edge 20 Pro brings 30 W charger (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Motorola Edge 20 Pro brings 30 W charger (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

Leaving the screen with automatic refresh rate and maximum brightness, I tested the battery running two hours of video via HBO Max, a video call for an hour and a half, about 30 minutes of Asphalt 9: Legends and Real Racing 3 added up, an hour of Chrome and social media, plus a 10-minute call.

I started the tests in the morning, with 100% load. By 10:00 pm, the cell phone was still nearly 60% charged, a very good average for a 4,500 mAh battery.

The recharge time from 15% to 100% with the 30W TurboPower charger that came with the product was approximately one hour. It’s just a shame there’s no wireless charging here.

Motorola Edge 20 Pro: is it worth it?

The Motorola Edge 20 Pro fulfills its role: to be a brand option for those looking for an advanced smartphone. It may not have all the elements of sophistication we find in a Galaxy S21 Ultra, for example, but it comes close.

Let’s also take into account that Edge 20 Pro brings relevant differentials. I’m talking about periscopic camera and Ready For modes. None of these features are essential, on the other hand, they can enhance the user experience.

Stereo audio and a little more physical protection are missing elements here, but overall, you can see that Motorola has gone to great lengths to create a standout smartphone.

Motorola Edge 20 Pro (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)
Motorola Edge 20 Pro (image: Emerson Alecrim/Tecnoblog)

This is visible, among other factors, by the presence of an OLED screen and the inclusion of a quick charger in the product packaging. After a shower of criticism, even the Android update policy Motorola tried to improve. Regarding the Motorola Edge+, the evolution is undeniable.

For all that, the Edge 20 Pro is a worthwhile option for anyone looking for an advanced cell phone. Yes, the suggested price of R$4,999 is high, but at least it’s more “down to earth” than the R$8,000 charged at Edge+’s launch in 2020.

Anyway, the old tip of waiting for rebates or promotions remains valid.

Technical specifications

  • Screen: pOLED Max Vision, 6.7 inches, full HD+ (2400×1080 pixels), 394 ppi, 20:9 format, 144 Hz refresh rate, HDR10+, Gorilla Glass 5
  • Processor: Snapdragon 870 with Adreno 650 GPU
  • RAM: 12 GB
  • Internal storage: 256 GB, UFS 3.1, (no microSD expansion)
  • Frontal camera: 32 megapixels, f/2.2, 4K recording (30 fps)
  • rear cameras:
    • Main: 108 megapixels, f/1.9, 8K recording (24 fps)
    • wide angle and macro: 16 megapixels, f/2.2, 119-degree angle
    • Telephoto lens (periscopic): 8 megapixels, f/3.4, OIS, 5x optical zoom
  • Drums: 4,500 mAh with 30 W TurboPower charger
  • Connectivity: 2G, 3G, 4G, 5G, dual SIM, Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax), Bluetooth 5.1, GPS, Glonass, Galileo, NFC, USB-C
  • Sensors: accelerometer, proximity, gyroscope, ambient light, fingerprint
  • Operational system: Android 11 (with promised updates for Android 12 and 13)
  • dimensions: 163.3 x 76 x 8 mm
  • Weight: 190 g

Motorola Edge 20 Pro

pros

  • Respect OLED screen
  • Periscopic camera is a cool idea
  • good battery life
  • Ready For is a nice addition
  • great overall performance

cons

  • No stereo sound
  • It could have IP68, right?
  • Wireless recharge too

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