7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic resident

Hearing the term north pole, we must imagine the tundra region full of snow with super cold air. Only tough creatures can survive in the wild.

As for muskox is one of the tough ruminant in the North Pole. Not only against the fierce climate and lack of food sources, they also have to deal with predators such as polar wolves.

Then, how do they survive in the north pole? Come on, recognize muskox through the following seven facts!

1. Close relatives of wild goats and sheep

commons.wikimedia.org/Кирилл Уютнов

Even if at first glance like a bison, muskox actually more closely related to goats and sheep, you know. Muskox included in the sub-family Caprinae along with several types of wild goats, ibexand sheep.

Animals with scientific names Ovibos moschatus this is the biggest member of the sub-family. Muskox get its name from the pungent odor that is usually issued by males during mating season.

2. Consists of two native subspecies of Canada and Greenland

7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/ilovegreenland

Muskox consists of only two subspecies that live in different regions. First, musrenoxen ground barren (Ovibos moschatus moschatus) which is native to Canada and was extinct in Alaska in the late 1800s. Second, white-faced muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus wardi) which is native to Greenland and has a smaller body.

3. Ruminant ruminant

7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/Quartl

This ruminant has a size that is large enough. Citing the page Animal Diversity, muskox has an average height of 1.2 meters and a length of between 1.2 to 2.5 meters. The weight of males is 320 kilograms on average and smaller females weighing 250 kilograms.

Also Read: 5 Reasons That Cause Ancient Giant Animals Extinct Quickly

4. Have horns that continue to grow for life

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7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

Both males and females have horns that continue to grow throughout their lives. In males, these horns are seen fused to the forehead. The researchers suspect that this is to protect their heads when fighting over females.

5. Eat grass

7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/Education Specialist

All day, muskox explore the tundra in search of food. They will eat any plants that can be found to survive, such as grass, bushes, moss, up to lichen (moss crust).

Usually, they live in an area that is close to a river. In winter, they dig deep snow with their soles to look for grass underneath.

6. Have quality wool at exorbitant prices

7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

To survive in extreme cold climates, muskox has two layers of fur. Citing the page Oceanwide Expedition, the fur in the outer layer is dark in color and grows to reach the legs. Meanwhile, the layer underneath consists of soft wool called qiviut.

Qiviut called stronger and eight times warmer than fleece. The wool also does not shrink when exposed to water and is durable. No wonder, wool qiviut This is priced at exorbitant prices, even more expensive than cashmere.

7. Survive in flocks

7 Facts about Muskox, a formidable Bison-like Arctic residentcommons.wikimedia.org/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Generally, muskox live in a herd of dozens of tails. Life in flocks makes it easy for them to protect each other from predator attacks like polar wolves.

When threatened, they will circle muskox young with sharp horns directed at predators. They can be very aggressive. Even if they are big, they can chase you at 40 kilometers per hour.

Now, after knowing the seven facts, what do you think about this one animal?

Also Read: 5 Facts of Dolly Sheep, the First Mammal from Cloned Cells

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